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An accompanying music video for the song was shot in Ouarzazate, Morocco in solidarity with the women to drive movement, premiering on 3 February 2012. with cowriters Danja and Marcella, who were listening to the record's main mix in a jeep, were revealed on the rapper's official website and her Twitter page. S Remix featuring rappers Missy Elliott and Azealia Banks; the Switch Remix, which still features Missy Elliott but also features Rye Rye replacing Azealia Banks; and the Leo Justi remix. "Bad Girls" is a midtempo R&B song with elements of Middle Eastern and Indian hooks with influences of dancehall and worldbeat music. could toss off when she wanted to, while commending the chorus as being in the same vein as that of "XXXO", a track from M. Because of these, the song exhibits what David Marchese of Spin describes as a "vaguely sinister" rhythm slither. It's just sort of filling space." Robert Copsey of Digital Spy wrote that the song served as a "timely reminder" that the musician could make a chart-friendly hit when and if she so chooses.

Directed by Romain Gavras and written by Arulpragasam, the video garnered universal acclaim and accolades from other artists. Preceding its release, "Bad Girls" was premiered on audio sharing site Sound Cloud on 30 January 2012; the song premiered live on worldwide radio the same day on BBC Radio 1. Nick Levine of NME commented that the song's chorus was one of those "boffo pop choruses" that M. Lyrically, the song explores themes of sexual empowerment. He appreciated its hook as a line "loaded with the kind of sex, drugs and rock 'n' roll fluff that most of today's chart hoggers are spouting" and probably the "last thing we expected to hear from the politically-minded Sri Lankan" adding that it was also a line that few could pull off so spectacularly. might want to throw at the moment." Priya Elan of the NME praised the song, writing "With his help this is MIA as you’ve never heard her before, taking her pan-global pop smarts and injecting them with a huge growth hormone...

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