Types of aggressive relationships in adolescent dating violence

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Compared to non-exposed females, females with were at increased risk of smoking (PR = 3.61), depressive symptoms (down/hopeless, PR = 1.41; lost interest, PR = 1.36), eating disorders (fasting, PR = 3.37; vomiting, PR = 2.66), having 5 intercourse partners (PR = 2.20), and having anal sex (PR = 2.18).

For males, no health differences were observed for those experiencing For females, more pronounced adverse health was observed for those exposed to physical/sexual versus non-physical dating violence.

However, adults can be repeatedly aggressive and use power over each other, too.

Adults in the workplace have a number of different laws that apply to them that do not apply to kids.

As discussed by Tolman (1992), it may be somewhat artificial to separate emotional abuse from physical forms of abuse because physical forms of abuse also inflict emotional and psychological harm to victims, and both forms of abuse serve to establish dominance and control over another person.

The present investigation expands upon prior studies by examining the relationship between health in late adolescence and the experience of physical/sexual and non-physical dating violence victimization, including dating violence types that are relevant to today’s adolescents (e.g., harassment via email and text messaging).

We examined the relationship between physical/sexual and non-physical dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19 and health in late adolescence/early adulthood.

The sample comprised 585 subjects (ages 18 to 21; mean age, 19.8, SD = 1.0) recruited from The Ohio State University who completed an online survey to assess: 1) current health (depression, disordered eating, binge drinking, smoking, and frequent sexual behavior); and 2) dating violence victimization from age 13 to 19 (retrospectively assessed using eight questions covering physical, sexual, and non-physical abuse, including technology-related abuse involving stalking/harassment via text messaging and email).

Multivariable models compared health indicators in never-exposed subjects to those exposed to physical/sexual or non-physical dating violence only.

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